e.nigma 2015

A while ago I was asked what the theme is running on this WordPress instance. I answered that I made this theme a while ago to be used on this blog. My conversational partner continued: „Is this theme  available for public?“.  There it was, that awkward moment when somebody asks you for a piece of code but you think it is not good enough to be published. „Well… Not yet. But I think I should offer it to everybody“, I replied.

So I started rewriting and optimizing most of the code to finally reach a level that I think is worth to be published. I named the theme e.nigma 2015 to refer to its original purpose to serve as the layout I’m using for my blog. You can find more details on e.nigma 2015 in my Portfolio section. The theme is listed in the official WordPress.org repository and can also be grabbed on GitHub.

Fork on GitHub WordPress.org Theme-Repository

Introducing e.nigma buttons

You all now that: You are using a software which brings a lot of functionality but there is always the one feature that is missing. In WordPress this situation is not as disappointing as for other software because WordPress allows the user to extend its functionality with plugins.

Some weeks ago I started writing on the e.nigma 2015 theme (which is already submitted to the WordPress.org repository but is still in review). Here and there I wanted to extend the theme’s functionality with shortcodes that allow the user to easily add buttons to their blog posts and pages. However, I missed that the WordPress team says1 that custom shortcodes should come with plugins, not with themes. Consequently, I transferred the button functionality to a WordPress plugin: e.nigma buttons.


  1. https://make.wordpress.org/themes/handbook/guidelines/plugin-territory/ 

Open the current Safari tab in Firefox Developer Edition

Some month ago I decided to split the browser I’m using for development from that one which I use for my everyday tasks. From that day on I used Safari for that everyday tasks. It is a very nice and fast browser. Since Apple introduced that extensions and one had not to go the SIMBL way anymore that browser made an enormous progress in the discipline of speed and energy efficiency. However, there is a feature that is (for me) horrible to use: The developer tools. As Google Chrome had a much better approach, I sticked to Chrome for development.

Roughly a month ago Mozilla released Firefox Developer Edition. A browser adjusted to fulfill all the stuff that developers need for their everyday work. Seriously, it is a really nice alternative to the developer tools shipped with Google Chrome.

Nevertheless, there is one thing that is a really big pain in the ass if you use two different browsers. There are many(!) situations were you want to open the current web page in a different browser. One thing that you can do is copy & paste that URL. This is very time consuming and not really „2014“. As there are tools available like Alfred you no longer need to do things like this manually. For Chrome I always used the Alfred2URLInChrome workflow. You just open the Alfred window type in „Firefox“ and there you are. Guess what! A similar Alfred workflow for Firefox is not available.

Introducing Ace OSF mode

I recently introduced CodeMirror OSF mode. For an upcoming project (spoiler!) I need an editor which features live validation of OSF documents. The popular editor Ace has an easy way to implement such features. Ace OSF mode was born.


Install

This Ace mode is available once you have installed Ace in your document. Then, all you have to do is to select this mode in Ace. Somehow like this:


Demo


Download

Ace OSF mode is released under the MIT license.

Fork on GitHub Download